Thursday, April 06, 2017

behavioral variant FTD

We're coming up on the 3rd anniversary of my husband Randy's dementia diagnose.
Frontotemporal degeneration to be exact.
Of course looking back we can see changes as far back as 2011. So technically he is going on 6 years, and considered moderate by his neurologist at the Banner Alzheimers Institute. He goes in for a yearly test to evaluate the progression... and that's it. He takes 40 mg of Citalopram in the morning and 100 mg of Seroquel at night... and that's it.

Randy has behavioral variant FTD. Those diagnosed with progressive nonfluent aphasia FTD have trouble speaking and producing language. Randy has no trouble recalling words and is still quite articulate. Very thankful for that.

Behavioral variant FTD

Mild bvFTD

In the first several years, a person with bvFTD (sometimes called Pick's disease or just FTD) tends to exhibit marked behavioral changes such as disinhibition, apathy, loss of sympathy or empathy for others, or overeating. Problems with planning organization and sometimes memory are evident, but the individual is still capable of managing household tasks and self-care with minimal help. However, impairment in judgment can lead to financial indiscretions with potentially catastrophic consequences. Social withdrawal, apathy and less interest in family, friends and hobbies may be evident. At times, they may behave inappropriately with strangers, lose their social manners, act impulsively and even break laws.  

Moderate bvFTD

Over the course of a few years, the symptoms seen in the mild stage will become more pronounced and disabling. You might also notice compulsive behaviors like repetitive urination, hoarding or collecting objects, compulsive cleaning or silly repetitive movements. Binge eating may create weight problems and other health issues. The cognitive problems associated with dementia become more pronounced, with mental rigidity, forgetfulness and severe deficits in planning and attention. The MRI image at this point will show that the shrinking of the brain tissue has expanded to larger areas of the frontal lobes, as well as the tips of the temporal lobes and basal ganglia, deeper brain structures involved in motor coordination, cognition, emotions and learning.

Randy's current repetitive, obsessive behaviors ~
  • he turns every light on in the house. Constantly. Like every single light and every ceiling fan.
  • he's constantly asking for waffles. I make homemade waffles every Sunday, and then make them up each day till the batter is gone. He loves them so much.
  • he rarely asks me to take him to QT for a Coke, but visitors are asked to take him. 
  • it's a compulsion... anxiety... when things are out of the norm.
  • and when he wants them to leave, he sweetly tells them he is going to walk them to their car.
  • oh that we could all be so blunt. ha!
  • he turns the shower on, walks away and it's left running till I discover it. My water bill...
  • he loves taking showers. So thankful for that.
  • he's so happy laying on his bed and listening to his music.
One of my very favorite photos.
Me, my man and the mighty Mississippi. (2005)

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

Thank you, Linda.
I miss you guys.
Much love, Sharon Weber